Student accommodation Guide for Czech students

When they attend university, many students stay away from family and friends. Perhaps you’re fresh out of high school, relocating out of your parents’ house for the first time, or eager to take control of your life. Maybe you’re a re-enrolling student. 

You had a good time partying as a freshman, but now you’re seeking a safe spot to sleep after a long day at hand at the university. Whatever situation you find yourself in, here are some tips to follow when looking for the ideal student housing!

Types of student accommodation

The types of student accommodation:

  • Flats and residential halls for students 

Many European universities and colleges provide student housing in a student residence hall or complex of apartments. There are frequent community facilities where you may meet fellow students, such as a lounge or TV room, a library, or gardens, so it’s a terrific opportunity to establish friends. 

Some dormitories and residences include cafeterias that serve cold and hot meals and common kitchens where you may prepare your own meals. 

You’ll normally get your own room, although you could be given shared housing with one or more other students.

A bed, closet, cabinet, and desk are usually included in the room. Check to see whether bedding, towels, curtains, cookware, Wi-Fi access, and other amenities are included. Some accommodations have private toilet and shower facilities, while others may have shared amenities.

  • Private accommodation

Many students prefer to live in private student housing. You have the option of renting a room on your own or sharing it with other students. Sharing might help you save money while also being social. You usually have your own room, but you share the toilet, kitchen, and living rooms with others. 

Search for innovative ways to live, such as staying with a local host family or participating in an ‘intergenerational living’ initiative. Senior citizens lease out a room in their home to a student. 

It’s wise to ask your institution whether they can make recommendations for private housing. They could have a list of respected real estate agents. Many student organizations have websites that might assist you in finding information.

Picking your roommates

Student accommodation Guide for Czech students 2

You could be compelled to find roommates through acquaintances in halls, on your program, or via a society you’re a member of. Check to see whether these are individuals you’d like to live with. Even the tightest of friendships may be tested by living with somebody. 

A person’s ability to be your perfect pub friend does not imply that they will be your ideal flatmate. Consider whether they will help with the dishes, pay their bills on time, and positively influence the test season. 

You may explore using a house-share service or a buddy of a friend to move in with individuals you don’t know at all. It’s critical that you have a chance to see if you’ll get along as housemates.

What is the best place to live? 

Many university towns and cities have formed student zones with a high number of like-minded individuals and a society that is generally open and accepting of students. Nevertheless, you should evaluate the geography of these regions because they are generally rather far from the institution, so it may not be the ideal option for you if you really want to wake up in the morning and attend early hours classes.

Documents required

Documents that you may be required to present at a student housing in the Czech Republic:

These documents must be kept on you at all times. 

  • Your proof of identification 
  • Your essential financial documentation proving that you can afford to live in the student housing in Prague
  • Contracts for accommodation 
  • Admission letter from the university. 
  • Your travel documentation(passport, visa)

Take a look at the facilities available. 

When you’re looking for convenient student housing in the city, pay attention to the amenities available. For instance, personally evaluating the condition of the cushions, bedspreads, and comforters would be preferable. If at all feasible, you should also examine the kitchen and hygiene. 

While checking the student hall amenities, keep an eye out for important details like the placement of bookshelves, storage pedestals, desks, and wardrobes. Make sure you discuss these amenities, as well as any supplementary rules and restrictions with the landlord.

Conclusion

Student housing may be a tough situation for students to navigate. For many of them, this will be their first time away from their family members and friends.

We hope this article helps you organize your shift to your student accommodation timeline. We wish you the best of luck with your future endeavours.

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